The Invasion Of Poland - wwiihistory.net Invasion of Poland

The Invasion Of Poland


Invasion of Poland

The Invasion of Poland marked the beginning of World War II. On September 1, 1939, Germany invaded Poland. It was the prelude to World War II. A ‘Non-Aggression’ agreement was signed with Russia before the assault . Later, Russia too attacked Poland and attached several areas.

Invasion Of Poland By Germany And Russia

Invasion of Poland
The Invasion Of Poland

A secret pact was on between Russia and Germany before the invasion of Poland. This pact assured the Germans of non-interference by Russia. Later, the Russians launched their own invasion. Soon, Poland was facing partition as German and Russian territories under the German-Soviet Frontier Treaty. Hitler, driven by his Revanchism (desire to reclaim lost territories of a Nation) and Imperialism ideals, began his campaign. He singled out Poland as his first venture toward fulfillment of the same.

Prelude To Invasion Of Poland

The first Invasion
The Invasion Of Poland

The invasion of Poland is the most significant event in World War II as this aggression announced the beginning of the War. The invasion began on September 1, 1939. It is important to note that Germany had signed a non-aggression pact with Poland in 1934. On the contrary, Poland under the treaty of Versailles, was the recipient of many provinces of Germany.

Consequently, this agreement had been highly disagreeable to the Germans. Hitler had a shrewd reason for playing on nicely. The treaty of Versailles had also put an embargo on militarization and further armament. Hitler was simply buying time to rebuild to avoid a Polish-French military alliance before Germany was ready. Hitler patiently waited and prepared for invasion of Poland

Propaganda Before Invasion

Propaganda aplenty
The Invasion Of Poland

Poland had a pact in place with Britain and France. However, with their limited capacity to assist, Poland had to fend for itself. The German foray into Poland begun on September 1, with the infamous ”Gleiwitz incident”. The German soldiers posing as polish troops began invading their own German Radio Station. This is commonly known as a ‘false flag’ operation with a purpose to deceive and, accuse any other party of aggravation.

The troops then used the radio station to announce the Polish invasion of Germany which frightened the German citizens. Several dozen other false flag operations and various anti-Polish propaganda such as Poland’s persecution of ethnic Germans, etc were order of the day.

Might Of The Germans

Blitzkrieg
The Invasion Of Poland

The very next day Germany invaded Poland on numerous such pretexts justifying the aggression. Germany used Blitzkrieg tactics effectively in World War II starting with Poland. Blitzkrieg is an unexpected speedy assault with superior armaments to create physiological fear and dismantle the opposition. To this effect, the Polish forces were quickly encircled, isolated and invaded from all sides by German forces and mighty tanks. Coordinated German aggression from North to South and West direction sent Polish forces to quick retreat.

Surrender Of Poland

Devastation
The Invasion Of Poland

A series of Battles followed and, a various group of inferior Polish forces wilted against German’s relentless and superior assault. Poland did not stand a chance due to the inability of allies Britain and France to provide any support. Eventually, on September 27, 1939, Poland succumbed and surrendered, unable to withstand the might of a huge battalion, 1000 aircraft, and more than 2000 latest German tanks. The defeat of Poland was swift and was a mere war target practice for the Germans who had set an eye on subduing the whole of Europe.

Poland was devastated by the German and the subsequent attack by Russia. A few million civilian deaths were reported during these times. Undoubtedly, the atrocities on the Polish, including women and children are among the worst war crimes of any era. The German held the whole of Poland by the time of the invasion of Russia and, up to January 1945.

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