Germany In World War II


Germany In World War II

The involvement of Germany in World War II can be traced to the Treaty of Versailles post World War 1. The Central Power comprising of countries including Germany fought with Entente powers made up of Britain, France, and Russia. In the end, Germany had to accept humiliating terms under the Treaty of Versailles. This included acceptance of responsibility of the conflict, embargo on further armament, reparations, and loss of colonies. These terms had always remained a deep scar in the German psyche.

Germany In World War II
Germany In World War II

Nazism

Hitler manipulated this sense of injustice alongside the economic downturn to come into Power. Firstly, Revanchism (desire to reclaim lost territories of a Nation) and Imperialism was the essential drive of Hitler. To this extent, Hitler secretly pursued the active re-militarization of German.

Invasion of Poland

The invasion of Poland on 1 September 1939 was the pivotal movement that began World War II. Russia followed suit and annexed parts of Poland by allying with Germany. Britain and France, who had failed to convince Germany to withdraw, formally declared war on Germany. Thus World War II began.

Invasion Of Western Europe

To establish further hegemony, Germany went on to invade Norway and Denmark. On 10 May 1940, Germany invaded France, and on 10 June 1940, Italy joined hands. France fell and was divided into German and Italian occupation zones. Having swiftly defeated Luxembourg, Belgium, and The Netherlands, Germany turned its attention toward Great Britain.

War With Britain

With the whole of western Europe under the German flag, only Britain stood in its path of complete victory in the west. In spite of devastating German air power and naval superiority, Britain refused German ultimatum for surrender.

Hitler made an erroneous assumption that he could bring down the British with air power. Germany’s air raids over Britain was in full swing from 10 July to October 1940 and, intermittently up to 1941. However, the RAF of Britain remained undefeated. The campaign was withdrawn due to the Russian campaign in June 1941.

Invasion Of Russia

The German-Soviet Pact was in place during Poland’s invasion, and Poland was in control of both the parties. However, in violation of this treaty, Germany invaded Russia on 22 June 1941. Furthermore, Hitler assumed that Britain’s refusal to surrender was based on the hope of future involvement of Russia and America. To nullify this possibility, Hitler wished to neutralize Russia. But, the Russian demands were not agreeable to Germany. Hence Hitler wanted to take out Russia from further involvement.

Despite being on other war fronts, Hitler again would erroneously assume that Russia would fall before winter, The early swift and commendable victories further lend credence to this belief. In the beginning, Germany made deep inroads in the summer and autumn campaign of 1941. However, a determined Red army held German progress to Moscow and Leningrad. A massive counteroffensive forced the German military towards the outskirts of Moscow.

Germany In World War II
Germany In World War II

Defeat Of Germany In World War II

Indeed, up to 1943, there were sufficient reasons to believe that Germany’s campaign of total control would succeed. However, with the onslaught of Russian winter, the fault-lines and setbacks began to manifest.

The battle of Stalingrad dismantled the powerful Sixth Army of Germany. Britain bought to end the successful venture of General Rommel in North Africa. Eventually, the Americans had bought their might to strengthen the Allied forces. Germany’s naval forces and U-boats were sinking in the sea battle with the British and American navy. Lastly, the Allied forces were defeating Germans in France.

After the successful annihilation of Germany in their country, Russians moved forward towards Germany. By 1945, Allied forces were both on foot and in the air all over Germany. With apparent defeat approaching, Hitler committed subside in 1945 and, Germany surrendered.

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